Curriculum Kernewek

Cornwall Agreed Syllabus 2011

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Suggested Activities
+ Show pupils Shape Outlines and reveal that there are three odd shapes out (flower, straight lines, triangle). Challenge pupils to identify the odd ones out and collect their ideas. Remove the odd ones out leaving the cross shapes. Ask pupils; what are these shapes? Where have you seen them before?
+ Split the class into groups and give each group a set of Cross Shapes
Reproduced courtesy of Andrew Langdon.
. Reveal that the drawn shapes have been taken from real stone crosses but that they are all slightly different designs. Give each group a set of Stone Crosses and challenge pupils to match each photograph with a drawing of the same design.
+ Ask each group to share one of the matches they have made with the class and compare their choices with other groups. When groups have matched their crosses correctly cut up several copies of Cross Types and give each group a set of the Number Cards in the left-hand column of the table. Explain that you will describe a type of cross and they must match your description to one of the picture pairs. Use the Description in the right-hand column of the table to read Description 1 for 'Cross Slab'. Ask pupils to guess which picture you are describing and place the related numbered card next to the picture. Repeat for the other cross types/numbers until the pupils have matched each numbered card to a cross. Encourage pupils to share their matches with the class and use the images and cards to make a cross display.
+ Visit a local church and challenge pupils to find as many crosses as they can. Ask pupils; why are there so many crosses? Why is the cross important to Christians? Challenge pupils to explore a church inside and out (including cemetery) and to find as many different stone shapes as they can. Collect pupil findings e.g. angels, gargoyles, doves. Ask pupils; why have people used stone to make these? What makes stone special/useful?
+ Ask pupils; have you ever seen a stone cross? Where? Are there any near here? Take pupils to see a local cross and encourage pupils to record their observations – make a rubbing if possible, measuring, drawing (recording signs of damage etc). Ask pupils; why did people carve this stone? Why did they put it here? Did/do people use it? How?
+ Show pupils Badge and ask pupils; why would someone wear this badge? Collect pupil ideas; that they like something, belong to something, believe something. Explain that some people think that stone crosses are a type of badge and people living here in the past would have let everyone else know that they were Christians by putting the stone up.
+ Show pupils Fence and ask pupils; why would someone put up a fence? Collect pupil ideas; to keep people out, to let people know that it belongs to someone, to let people know that it is special or different. Explain that some people think that stone crosses are a type of fence and people living here in the past would have put the stone there to let everyone else know that the land had been made special to God.
+ Show pupils Signpost and ask pupils; why would someone put up a sign? Collect pupil ideas; to let people know the way. Explain that some people think that stone crosses are a type of signpost and people living here in the past would have set up the stone to show people the way to their church.
+ Set up each table with a different cross making activity e.g. wax, potato prints, clay, papier mache. Split the class into groups and rotate the groups around the tables giving each group chance to use different media to make a range of colourful crosses.
Reproduced courtesy of Andrew Langdon.
Reproduced courtesy of Andrew Langdon.
Reproduced courtesy of Andrew Langdon.
Reproduced courtesy of Andrew Langdon.